Kampung Indonesia

Kampung Indonesia.

Visit the Indonesian Village for an authentic experience of Indonesian culture, cuisine, craft, music and dance.

There will be:

 

Javanese gamelan performance

Gamelan workshop – free guided hands on experience on playing the gamelan instruments for visitors to Kampung Indonesia (delivered by experts from Oxford Gmelan Society)

Indonesian Language Workshop – free taster sessions of Indonesian Language for visitors to Kampung Indonesia (delivered by qualified teachers from the Indonesian Embassy London)

Indonesian traditional costumes photo booth – a chance for visitors to try on variety of Indonesian costumes and snap it on cameras for an ever-lasting memories

Meet the Komodo Dragon – a life size prototype of a real komodo dragon will be present at Kampung Indonesia for visitors to stroke or take a picture with it.

Pencak Silat performance – traditional Indonesian martial arts

Traditional Indonesian dance performance – by dancers from Induk London

Variety of Indonesian street food stalls

Street Food

Indonesian cuisine is one of the most vibrant and colorful cuisines in the world, full of intense flavor. It is eclectic and diverse.  Many regional cuisines exist, often based upon indigenous culture and foreign influences.  Indonesia has around 5,350 traditional recipes, with 30 of them considered the most important.  Indonesia’s cuisine may include rice, noodle and soup dishes in modest local eateries to street-side snacks and top-dollar plates.

Indonesian cuisine varies greatly by region and has many different influences.  Sumatran cuisine, for example, often has Middle Eastern and Indian influences, featuring curried meat and vegetables such as gulai and curry, while Javanese cuisine is mostly indigenous, with some hint of Chinese influence. Elements of Chinese cuisine can be seen in Indonesian cuisine: foods such as noodles, meat balls, and spring rolls have been completely assimilated.

Indonesian cuisine often demonstrates complex flavour, acquired from certain ingredients and bumbu spices mixture. Indonesian dishes have rich flavours; most often described as savory, hot and spicy, and also combination of basic tastes such as sweet, salty, sour and bitter. Most of Indonesians favour hot and spicy food, thus sambal, Indonesian hot and spicy chili sauce with shrimp paste, is a staple condiment at all Indonesian tables.  Seven main Indonesian cooking methods are frying, grilling, roasting, dry roasting, sautéing, boiling and steaming.

Meet the Komodo Dragon

The Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis), also known as the Komodo monitor, is a species of lizard found in the Indonesian islands of Komodo.   A member of the monitor lizard family Varanidae, it is the largest living species of lizard, growing to a maximum length of 3 metres (10 ft) in rare cases and weighing up to approximately 70 kilograms (150 lb).

In the wild, an adult Komodo dragon usually weighs around 70 kg (150 lb), although captive specimens often weigh more.  According to Guinness World Records, an average adult male will weigh 79 to 91 kg (174 to 201 lb) and measure 2.59 m (8.5 ft), while an average female will weigh 68 to 73 kg (150 to 161 lb) and measure 2.29 m (7.5 ft).  The largest verified wild specimen was 3.13 m (10.3 ft) long and weighed 166 kg (366 lb), including undigested food.

The Komodo dragon has a tail as long as its body, as well as about 60 frequently replaced, serrated teeth that can measure up to 2.5 cm (1 in) in length. Its saliva is frequently blood-tinged, because its teeth are almost completely covered by gingival tissue that is naturally lacerated during feeding.  It also has a long, yellow, deeply forked tongue.  Komodo dragon skin is reinforced by armoured scales, which contain tiny bones called osteoderms that function as a sort of natural chain-mail. This rugged hide makes Komodo dragon skin a poor source of leather.

Pencak Silat Street Performance

By Members of Pencak Silat Federation UK

TRADITIONAL INDONESIAN MARTIAL ARTS

It is a full-body fighting form incorporating strikes, grappling and throwing in addition to weaponry. Every part of the body is used and subject to attack.  Pencak silat was practiced not only for physical defense but also for psychological ends.

Although the word silat is widely known throughout much of Southeast Asia, the term pencak silat is used mainly in Indonesia. Pencak silat was chosen in 1948 as a unifying term for the Indonesian fighting styles. It was a compound of the two most commonly used words for martial arts in Indonesia. Pencak was the term used in central and east Java, while silat was used in Sumatra and Borneo. In Minang usage, pencak and silat are seen as being two aspects of the same practice. Pencak is the essence of training, the outward aspect of the art which a casual observer is permitted to witness as performance. Silat is the essence of combat and self-defense, the true fighting application of the techniques which are kept secret from outsiders and not divulged to students until the guru deems them ready. While other definitions exist, all agree that silat cannot exist without pencak, and pencak without silat skills is purposeless.

Gamelan Music

Gamelan (/ˈɡæməlæn/) is the traditional ensemble music of Java in Indonesia, made up predominantly of percussive instruments. The most common instruments used are metallophones played by mallets and a set of hand-played drums called kendhang which register the beat. Other instruments include xylophones, bamboo flutes, a bowed instrument called a rebab, and even vocalists called sindhen.

Although the popularity of gamelan has declined since the introduction of pop music, gamelan is still commonly played on formal occasions and in many traditional Indonesian ceremonies. For most Indonesians, gamelan is an integral part of Indonesian culture.

The word gamelan comes from the low Javanese word gamel, which may refer to a type of mallet used to strike instruments or the act of striking with a mallet.  The term karawitan refers to classical gamelan music and performance practice, and comes from the word rawit, meaning ‘intricate’ or ‘finely worked’.  The word derives from the Javanese word of Sanskrit origin, rawit, which refers to the sense of smoothness and elegance idealized in Javanese music. Another word from this root, pangrawit, means a person with such sense, and is used as an honorific when discussing esteemed gamelan musicians. The high Javanese word for gamelan is gangsa, formed either from the words tembaga and rejasa referring to the materials used in bronze gamelan construction (copper and tin), or tiga and sedasa referring to their proportions (three and ten).[